Employment Dispute Attorneys

Florida Employment Attorneys

If you are like many Americans, you may spend more waking time working than engaging in activities outside of work. [Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, “American Time Use Survey – 2013 Results,” www.bls.gov, June 2014, accessed November 2014.”] When you encounter workplace harassment or discrimination of any kind, this home away from home can suddenly change—from a safe and welcoming environment to one fraught with danger or hostility. The resulting stress can negatively impact your health, your relationships, and even your job performance. [Source: American Psychological Association, Stress in AmericaTM: Missing the Health Care Connection, https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2012/full-report.pdf, February 2013, accessed November 2014.]

 

However, you may have hesitated to file a claim against your employer for fear of termination—and the resulting lost wages and benefits. At John Bales Attorneys, we don’t want you to worry about supporting your family or trying to deal with the situation on your own. Whether you were discriminated against, sexually harassed, wrongfully terminated, or retaliated against, you have rights. What you need is an employment dispute attorney.

 

We are here to help you—contact John Bales Attorneys today for a free consultation. Our experienced employment lawyers may be able to help get you back pay, restoration of your job, a court order to stop discrimination, or compensation for your pain and suffering.


 

John Bales Attorneys—Protecting Your Rights from Unlawful and Uncomfortable Behavior in the Workplace

 

According to both state and federal laws, employers are forbidden to discriminate against current or prospective employees based on:

  • Age
  • Disability
  • Genetic information
  • National origin
  • Pregnancy
  • Race
  • Religion
  • Sex

 

Laws also prohibit sexual harassment, wrongful termination, and employer retaliation.

 

Sexual Harassment: 

Examples of sexual harassment include unwanted sexual advances, demands for sexual favors, or any other sexual conduct at work—such as repeated inappropriate remarks, emails, or text messages. It is important that you follow your company’s grievance procedure to report any incidences. If that does not work, or if you continue to be harassed, you may have a legal claim.

 

Wrongful Termination:

Under Florida law, most employees are classified as “at will” employees (unless a written employment agreement changes this status). This means that your employer can fire you for any reason—with or without cause—so long as you are not terminated for illegal reasons, such as your age, disability, or sex.

 

Employer Retaliation:

If you filed a sexual harassment charge against your employer, questioned your employer’s results during a grievance investigation, or offered to assist in a sexual harassment investigation and then were retaliated against, the law may provide you with relief against the employer.

 

If you feel that you have been discriminated against or subjected to harassment in the state of Florida, you may need to file a claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or the Florida Commission on Human Relations (FCHR).

 

Because the EEOC and FCHR have set strict deadlines for filing a claim—or, statutes of limitations—it is critical that you contact John Bales Attorneys immediately. Our experienced employment lawyers will determine whether you should file with one or both of the agencies, investigate the circumstances surrounding your experience, and help you file your complaint within the required timeframe.

 


 

What can you expect with John Bales Attorneys?

Care. Quality. Respect.

 

If you have a workplace dispute with your employer or a colleague, contact the employment dispute attorneys at John Bales Attorneys today. No matter the situation, you deserve a safe working environment—and you deserve respect.

 

Laws are in place to protect your rights—do not tolerate this illegal behavior anymore. Our experienced employment lawyers can help you file a claim if you have experienced workplace discrimination, sexual harassment, wrongful termination, or retaliation. We understand the strict deadlines associated with these claims, and will work to quickly file a claim on your behalf, and help get you the resolution you deserve.

 

With John Bales Attorneys, you can feel confident supported by an experienced and compassionate law firm. We will keep you up to date throughout the entire process, and will do our best to answer any questions you may have along the way.

 

If you have an employment dispute, contact us today so we can begin working on your claim and you can get on with living.

 

Life does not wait. Why should you?

 

Call John Bales Attorneys now.

(800) 225-5564  

 

Florida Unpaid Overtime and Hours Attorneys

 

Under state and federal laws, such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employers are required to pay employees at least minimum wage—and overtime pay of at least 1½ the regular pay rate. Overtime applies to any hours worked above and beyond 40 hours in one week. However, sometimes employees go unpaid as employers fail to pay employees the wages they have earned.

If your employer failed to pay you overtime—or forced you to work off the clock—it may be in violation of the FLSA and Florida law. Even if you have questioned your employer, the answer you’ve received may be incomplete or inaccurate. Employment law can be complicated; so it is important that you get help from a qualified and experienced unpaid wages and hours attorney.

 

You may be hesitant to demand the overtime you have earned, and worried that your legal action may result in termination, reduced hours, or other unfair treatment. We at John Bales Attorneys want you to know, the law is here to protect you from retaliation. In some instances, the law allows for additional claims against your employer for relation.

 

If you have not received overtime pay that you have earned, contact John Bales Attorneys today for a free consultation. Our unpaid wages and hours lawyers will review your case and explain your potential rights or available recourse.


 

What can you expect with John Bales Attorneys?

Care. Quality. Respect.

 

If your employer has failed to pay you overtime as required by the FLSA and Florida law, contact the unpaid overtime lawyers of John Bales Attorneys today. We are committed to upholding your rights under the law, and will work to get you the compensation you are owed.

 

With John Bales Attorneys, you can feel confident supported by an experienced and compassionate law firm. We will keep you up to date throughout the entire process, and will do our best to answer any questions you may have along the way.

 

If you are owed overtime pay, contact us today so we can take action to help get you the resolution you deserve and the money you need.

 

Life does not wait. Why should you?

 

Call John Bales Attorneys now.

(800) 225-5564   

 

Do You Have Unpaid Wages? John Bales Attorneys Can Help.

Under state and federal laws, such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employers are required to pay employees a basic minimum wage. Unfortunately, employers sometimes fail to pay employees the correct amount of wages.

It is your right to collect the wages you have earned according to the FLSA and Florida law. In Florida, the minimum wage is recalculated yearly on September 30, and is in effect beginning January 1 of each year.

2014 2015
 Hourly employee $7.93/hour $4.91/hour + tips
Tipped employees $8.05/hour $5.03/hour + tips

 

[Source: U.S. Department of Labor, “Minimum Wage Laws in the States – September 1, 2014,” http://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/america.htm#Florida, accessed November 2014.]

 

If you are being under-compensated, talk to the unpaid wages lawyers at John Bales Attorneys. We are committed to upholding your rights under the law. Call us today at (800) 225-5564 or complete a free initial consultation form.

If your employer is not paying you the minimum wage as specified by law—or forced you to work off the clock—it may be in violation of the FLSA and Florida law. Even if you have questioned your employer, the answer you’ve received may be incomplete or inaccurate. Employment law can be complicated; so it is important that you get help from a qualified and experienced unpaid wages and hours attorney.

You may be hesitant to demand a fair wage, and worried that your legal action may result in termination, reduced hours, or other unfair treatment. We at John Bales Attorneys want you to know, the law is here to protect you from retaliation. If your employer takes a negative employment action against you for asserting your right to paid a fair wage, you may have an additional claim against your employer.

If you are being under-compensated, contact John Bales Attorneys today for a free consultation. Our unpaid wages and hours lawyers will review your case and explain your potential rights or available recourse.

 


 

What can you expect with John Bales Attorneys?

Care. Quality. Respect.

 

If your employer is paying you less than the minimum wage required by the FLSA and Florida law, contact  the unpaid wages and hours lawyers of John Bales Attorneys today. We are committed to upholding your rights under the law, and will work to get you the compensation you are owed.

With John Bales Attorneys, you can feel confident supported by an experienced and compassionate law firm. We will keep you up to date throughout the entire process, and will do our best to answer any questions you may have along the way.

If you are being under-compensated, contact us today so we can take action to help get you the wages you earned and the money you need.

Life doesn’t wait. Why should you?

 

Call John Bales Attorneys now.

(800) 225-5564   

What is FMLA?

An employee may be covered for leave under the FMLA if they meet specific criteria. These criteria include (a) being a covered employee under the FMLA, (b) being employed by a covered employer under the FMLA; and (c) have taken leave for specific family and/or medical reason under the FMLA. To be a “covered employee” under the FMLA, you must have been employed by a covered employer and work at a worksite within 75 miles of which that employer employs 50 people; have worked at least 12 months (which do not have to be consecutive) for the employer, and have worked at least 1,250 hours during the 12 months immediately before the date FMLA leave began. A “covered employer” under the FMLA includes private employers, and certain public employers, who engage in commerce, or in any industry affecting commerce, and who has 50 or more employees each working day during at least 20 calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.
Under the FMLA, a covered employee is entitled to take job-protected, unpaid leave for specified family and medical reasons. Eligible employees are entitled to:

  • 12 workweeks of leave in any 12-month period for:
    • Birth and care of the employee’s child, within one year of birth;
    • Placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care, within one year of the placement,
    • Care of an immediate family member (spouse, child, parent) who has a serious health condition;
    • For the employee’s own serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job, and
    • Any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son , daughter, or parent is on active duty or has been notified of an impending call to order to active duty in the U.S. National Guard or Reserves in support of a contingency operation.
  • 26 workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered servicemember with a serious injury or illness if the employee is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin of the servicemember.

Additionally, if an employee was receiving group health benefits when leave began, an employer must maintain them at the same level and in the same manner during period of FMLA leave as if the employee had continued to work.

An employee may take FMLA leave intermittently or on a reduced leave schedule when medically necessary. Taking intermittent leave for certain reasons such as birth of a child is subject to the employer’s approval. Employer approval is not necessary in certain circumstances as medically necessary.

When the need for leave is foreseeable, an employee must notify the employer at least 30 days in advance, or as far in advance as is reasonable. When the leave is not foreseeable, the employee must provide notice as soon as practicable under the circumstances. An employer may require supporting documentation from an employee’s care provider and request periodic reports of the employee’s intent to return to work.

Do you have a FMLA Claim?

Upon returning to work from FMLA leave, an employee is entitled to be restored to the same or an equivalent job with equivalent pay, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment. [1]

We will assist you in calculating the amount of any recovery owed with a FMLA Claim based on the information and documentation you provide to us. As discussed and authorized by you, once we have calculated and you have approved the amount of recovery an employer owes you, we will generally use this amount to make the initial demand to employer to resolve your claim. As discussed, this amount is the potential recovery a jury may award at trial if you are successful and the jury rejects all of the defenses from employer. You should not view this initial amount as the amount you will recover in your case because it usually is not. Instead, it is a negotiation tool to assist in our efforts to maximize your recovery by giving you the “room” to negotiate with employer. The reasonable settlement amount for your case will likely be less especially after we are advised of the employer’s defenses. We have several negotiation tools that may help you maximize your recovery, which we will evaluate with you based on the facts of your case.

Don’t wait another day, contact our attorneys now so that we can start working on your claim.

 


What can you expect with John Bales Attorneys?

Care. Quality. Respect.

 

If you feel that you have a FMLA Claim contact the FMLA lawyers of John Bales Attorneys today. We are committed to protecting your rights under the law, and will work towards getting you the compensation you deserve.

With John Bales Attorneys, you can feel confident supported by an experienced and compassionate law firm. We will keep you up to date throughout the entire process, and will do our best to answer any questions you may have along the way.

If you have questions about your FMLA rights, contact us today so we can work to help get you the money you need.

Life doesn’t wait. Why should you?

 

Call John Bales Attorneys now.

(800) 225-5564